Archive for January, 2013

“We need a sense of ownership of phylogenetic trees”

Where are the fungi datasets?

FungiA couple thousand fungi phylogeny studies have been published in the past twelve years. Clark University postdoc researcher Romina Gazis has gone through all of them. Now she is working on a bigger challenge: finding all the trees and datasets that were the foundation of those studies.

Ideally, all scientists who publish a phylogenetic tree would also deposit the datasets they used to create such trees at a publicly available online database. That allow other researchers to synthesize data from different sources to advance the knowledge about relationships between certain species and their evolutionary history.

Unfortunately, most of those datasets are not publicly available. Gazis only found datasets for about a quarter of the two-thousand fungi articles she surveyed. “Around 600 studies had tree files available, but not necessarily complete,” she concluded. “Some scientists deposited one but not all the trees.” (more…)


Tree of Life: Are big changes looming on the horizon?

All species like some gadgets

Photo by PublicDomainPictures (Creative Commons Deed CC0)While movie hero James Bond gets his spy gadgets from his loyal developer Q, almost every other species on Earth has to put a little more effort in armoring themselves. But that does not mean they cannot rely on some good ol’ friends to do so. In fact, the acquisition of genes from two or more species through lateral gene transfer can lead to innovations that at times can be painful—sometimes even deadly—to others.

One of those evolutionary novelties is noticeable for certain types of jellyfish that developed the ability to sting after their ancestors acquired a gene from a bacterium and incorporated that material in their own DNA. This gene transmission helped jellyfish to create an innovative defense tool to fend off other species that could endanger them. The result is quite frightening: more humans get killed by jellyfish than sharks. (more…)


Open Tree of Life featured in weekly science journal

tree02Four investigators of the Open Tree of Life project and four postdoc researchers affiliated with the project have published an article in the latest issue of Nature, an international weekly journal of science. They have concluded that, unfortunately, most phylogenetic trees and nucleotide alignments from the past two decades have been irrevocably lost. (“Data deposition: Missing data mean holes in tree of life”)

Click here for the the website of Nature  (subscription required).